Street Eats, Cambodia: Mangosteen or Rat on a Stick?

Welcome back to “Street Eats”, the series where we share our favourite street food from around the world. Grab a plate and join in!

Street Eats in Cambodia

Today, we’re skipping from Thailand and the deliciousness of Mango Sticky Rice to the neighbouring country of Cambodia. Unfortunate as it is, I have to admit – when it comes to street food, Cambodia doesn’t necessarily top the charts, or my charts anyways. While I always found something to eat while dining along the riverside in Siem Riep or after touring the magnificence of the Ankors near Phnom Penh, I can’t say I went in search of Cambodian street food during my visit to what is otherwise an incredible, incredible country.

Not my bag of spiders

Why didn’t street food in Cambodia appeal to my seemingly picky palate? Reason #1 would be that I don’t particularly enjoy fish. And by “not particularly”, I mean I hate it. With a passion. And unfortunately – from Fish Amok to the famous Khmer Curry (which can be served with beef or chicken) – there is a lot of fish floating (more likely being carted) around on the streets of Cambodia. Reason #2 would be that another specialty found along the streets, in the markets, and alongside the bus routes is insects, which after reading my post on Street Eats in Thailand, you’ll know I don’t rush to ingest. These babies (grilled tarantulas) were at a bus stop en route from Siem Reap to Phnom Penh. Would you, or wouldn’t you?

095

So, what exactly did I sample off the streets of Cambodia? Well, let me tell you, it wasn’t the rat-on-a-stick, or the snake-on-the-stick being sold on the streets of Siem Reap. Nope, in a warm southern country such as this, I chose to indulge in the vegetarian lifestyle and stuff my face with the sweetest – and most beautiful – fruit I have ever had. So, my vote goes to…

#1 Street Snack in Cambodia: The Purple Mangosteen

World Travels a) 319What is it? 

Mangosteen is a delicious fruit that grows throughout South East Asia. While it takes some practice to crack it open without making a mess of the tough outer layer (can be more or less difficult depending on the ripeness of the fruit), once you do, you won’t be disappointed.

The inside of the Mangosteen is a white flower like fruit that is juicy and sweet and will have you addicted after taking just one bite. Affordable and protected by it’s purple peel, the Mangosteen will help keep you hydrated and makes the perfect  snack for a day of touring the city.

Where can you find it?

You can find Mangosteen in just about every market around town. Load up on 5-10 of these juicy wonders and you’ll never go hungry again.

A shout out to…

Iced coffee in Cambodia. Never have I ever had a more delicious iced coffee than during my time in Cambodia. Highly caffeinated and prepped with plenty of sugar, this was just the kick I needed to start, end, or break up my day. Surprisingly found on almost every menu and, on some street corners (not many), this sweet delight is a great way to refresh. Iced coffee has never been the same since…

What’s your favourite Cambodian street snack? Leave it below! Want to read more about Cambodia? Check out:

Carefree in Cambodia: Phnom Penh and Siem Reap

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Categories: giraffe travel, street eats: foods from around the world, thetravelinggiraffe | Tags: , , , , , , | 5 Comments

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5 thoughts on “Street Eats, Cambodia: Mangosteen or Rat on a Stick?

  1. Pingback: Street Eats, Malaysia: Bullfrog or Durian fruit? | thefriendlygiraffe

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  5. Pingback: Street Eats, Helsinki, Finland: Reindeer Meatballs or Lake Fish? | thefriendlygiraffe

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